22 March, 2017
Social Media for Music Teachers

Social Media for Music Teachers


The way that social media is used has changed tremendously over the last few years. In the past, I used social media as a way to simply catch up on the lives of friends, follow celebrities, or look at pretty pictures. Although I still do those things, I'm now using social media as a form of professional development. In this blog post, I'll detail how to use social media to learn from other music teachers, gather ideas, and even learn new songs!

Social Media for Music Teachers: A comprehensive overview of how to use Pinterest, Twitter, Instagram, and more, to gather ideas for your music classroom


Pinterest
When I first happened upon Pinterest, I found tons of pins about home decor and women's fashion, and I wasn't all that interested. But then I discovered pins about education, and specifically music education, and I was hooked!

To search for music education pins, simply start a Pinterest account, then in the search bar, type "music education," "Kodaly," "Orff," etc. for lots of great pins with great ideas! When I typed "music education" into Pinterest today, I saw these pins:


See those words along the top? These are interests, which allow you to get even more specific! When I clicked "lessons," these pins came up:


When you click a pin, it takes you to that blog post, article, etc.

To see a sample of other great pins I've discovered over the years, check out these "Favorite Pins of the Month" posts. To follow me on Pinterest, click here.

For more information about how to use Pinterest, see this post. Lindsay Jervis also has a great post about music education pinners to follow here.
09 March, 2017
Melodic Intervention 101

Melodic Intervention 101



This past week, with my second graders, I have been doing centers to practice sol, la, mi, and do. Typically when I do centers (which you can read more about here), I choose the groups and tell students when to rotate. Last week, though, I've let the students choose which group to go to and when to switch, and I have LOVED the results. It feels so student-centered, and the students take so much ownership in their learning and their choices!

Today, I'm blogging about the set-up, the six centers, and how I provided intervention for those struggling melodically. Keep reading until the end of the post, so you can download several of the materials for free!

Melodic Intervention 101: Blog post includes lots of ideas for centers in your music room AND intervention for your struggling students. Includes a way to download some of the activities for free!

At the start of the lesson, after we played a singing game which included sol, la, mi, and do (I used "King's Land"), I explained each of the six centers. They were as follows:

#1: "Snow the Solfa" game by Amy Abbott
This is a great game to help students really look carefully at patterns on the staff. They choose a snowman, then choose which note/ solfa is not correct. I had this projected on my SMART board, but if you don't have a SMART board, you could have students at that center choose notes with a mouse, on your computer. (Keep reading to download this game for free!)

Melodic Intervention 101: Blog post includes lots of ideas for centers in your music room AND intervention for your struggling students. Includes a way to download some of the activities for free!


#2: Handbell patterns
I just bought these handbells this year, which I've loved for practicing solfa! I created patterns for this center, and students each grabbed a handball, another student held up the patterns, and they played through each pattern.  The handbells are pretty inexpensive, and are a great purchase if you don't get much money each year in your budget. (Keep reading to download the patterns for free!)


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